Gentlemen`s Agreement Us And Japan

Japan was prepared to limit immigration to the United States, but was seriously injured by San Francisco`s discriminatory law, which specifically targeted its people. President Roosevelt, who wanted to maintain good relations with Japan as a pole opposed to Russian expansion in the Far East, intervened. While the U.S. ambassador reassured the Japanese government, Roosevelt summoned the mayor and the San Francisco school board to the White House in February 1907 and convinced him to end segregation and promised that the federal government itself would address the issue of immigration. On February 24, the gentlemen`s agreement was reached with Japan in the form of a Japanese memo, in which it was agreed to deny passports to workers wishing to enter the United States and to recognize the right of the United States to exclude Japanese immigrants with passports initially issued to other countries. March 13, 1907 followed the formal withdrawal of the San Francisco School Board`s decision. A final Japanese note, dated February 18, 1908, made the gentlemen`s agreement fully effective. The agreement was replaced by the Immigration Exclusion Act of 1924. The gentlemen`s agreement forced the repeal of the school board. In exchange, the Japanese government agreed not to issue new passports to Japanese nationals who wished to work in the United States. However, the parents, children and wives of Japanese workers already in the United States could still immigrate to the United States. Critics of the agreement also noted that Japanese workers could still immigrate freely to Hawaii, and the “bildbraut” industry developed later, where Japanese male workers in the United States could choose a Japanese bride from the former country solely on the basis of posted photos. The provisions of the Gentlemen`s Agreement allowed Japanese immigrant communities to develop complex family networks in a way that previous Chinese communities could only reach for men.

San Francisco had 1900 90 Japanese companies and 1909,545 companies, despite the negative financial consequences of the 1906 earthquake.

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